Tomi Adeyemi’s Legacy of Orisha

She’s A Maji of Words

Tomi Adeyemi has won my fandom. I love speculative fiction. I love magic and tales of power passed on through bloodlines even more. I’m one of those people who gasped when Rey the Jedi started shooting sparks from her fingertips. (Don’t worry, I’m done with my spoilers for today). So last year when I heard there was a book series with Naija roots and a female protagonist, I cleared the weekend to go on the journey of Orisha.

Children of Blood and Bone captivated me. It was full of lush landscape descriptions, exposing of secrets, and the badassery of two young women figuring out their friendship. This friendship between Zelie and Amari has all the ups and downs you might expect from the high school and war narrative. I said no spoilers…I meant no spoilers. Trust, it gets deep.

Then I grabbed a copy of Children of Virtue and Vengeance just before our whole world changed in response to this pandemic. I found it hard to focus on reading this time. It took me months to finally get through it but, through it I am. The verdict? It was good. But, I want more. If book one felt like high school still sucks, then book two was definitely some I’m ready to graduate from this mess energy. The bottom line is that Zelie and Amari are growing up and moving from children to women is all about choices. Not everything can be undone. Not everyone is going with you to adulthood.

One important metaphor I see developing is an understanding of love as action. Nowadays people think love is something that either fills your belly or flies around in it and bonds you to someone forever. Adeyemi is quick to establish that love is (a) more than the romantic variety and (b) all about what you do for people. From pastel glowing underwater adventures just to make someone smile to controlling your anger so that it doesn’t consume the people around you, love as an action is front and center in this series. I’m going to wait for the next book to do any deeper dives into love and other themes because I respect the art of the story arc. In the meantime, I have to recommend hopping on this train. It’s a fun and wondrous ride.

Tomi Adeyemi has won my fandom. I love speculative fiction. I love magic and tales of power passed on through bloodlines even more. I’m one of those people who gasped when Rey the Jedi started shooting sparks from her fingertips. (Don’t worry, I’m done with my spoilers for today). So last year when I heard there was a book series with Naija roots and a female protagonist, I cleared the weekend to go on the journey of Orisha.

Children of Blood and Bone captivated me. It was full of lush landscape descriptions, exposing of secrets, and the badassery of two young women figuring out their friendship. This friendship between Zelie and Amari has all the ups and downs you might expect from the high school and war narrative. I said no spoilers…I meant no spoilers. Trust, it gets deep.

Then I grabbed a copy of Children of Virtue and Vengeance just before our whole world changed in response to this pandemic. I found it hard to focus on reading this time. It took me months to finally get through it but, through it I am. The verdict? It was good. But, I want more. If book one felt like high school still sucks, then book two was definitely some I’m ready to graduate from this mess energy. The bottom line is that Zelie and Amari are growing up and moving from children to women is all about choices. Not everything can be undone. Not everyone is going with you to adulthood.

One important metaphor I see developing is an understanding of love as action. Nowadays people think love is something that either fills your belly or flies around in it and bonds you to someone forever. Adeyemi is quick to establish that love is (a) more than the romantic variety and (b) all about what you do for people. From pastel glowing underwater adventures just to make someone smile to controlling your anger so that it doesn’t consume the people around you, love as an action is front and center in this series. I’m going to wait for the next book to do any deeper dives into love and other themes because I respect the art of the story arc. In the meantime, I have to recommend hopping on this train. It’s a fun and wondrous ride.